MeCS – Integrating prototype processing programs into clinical routine


Journal article


B. W. Lehr, F. Schweser, A. Deistung, D. Güllmar, J. Reichenbach
2010

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APA   Click to copy
Lehr, B. W., Schweser, F., Deistung, A., Güllmar, D., & Reichenbach, J. (2010). MeCS – Integrating prototype processing programs into clinical routine.


Chicago/Turabian   Click to copy
Lehr, B. W., F. Schweser, A. Deistung, D. Güllmar, and J. Reichenbach. “MeCS – Integrating Prototype Processing Programs into Clinical Routine” (2010).


MLA   Click to copy
Lehr, B. W., et al. MeCS – Integrating Prototype Processing Programs into Clinical Routine. 2010.


BibTeX   Click to copy

@article{b2010a,
  title = {MeCS – Integrating prototype processing programs into clinical routine},
  year = {2010},
  journal = {},
  author = {Lehr, B. W. and Schweser, F. and Deistung, A. and Güllmar, D. and Reichenbach, J.}
}

Abstract

INTRODUCTION – MRI data processing in daily clinical routine is usually conducted directly at the MRI workstation. However, newly developed processing methods are often not available at the MRI workstation until several years after their original development. Furthermore, available methods suffer from limited functional range, on the one hand for licensing reasons but on the other hand due to the limited computational power of the MRI workstations. Yet, new processing methods are available, as prototype processing programs (PPs). These PPs are developed during research, designed in optimized numerical calculating environments (MATLAB [1], IDL [2]), employing purpose-built packages (FSL [3], Freesurfer [4]), or require powerful hardware. If such PPs were available for clinical routine, improvements could be applied during method development, studies could be conducted earlier, and finally powerful diagnostic tools could be made widely available that were only accessible by a small number of selected institutions before. However, efficient usage of PPs for clinical routine depends on tight integration into the existing workflow as well as on high usability. Therefore, this contribution presents the Medical Computation Server (MeCS), to our knowledge the first approach to translate prototype processing programs into clinical routine.





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